29 August 2010

SPA SECTION NEWSLETTER, Volume XVII, Issue 62

SPECIAL ISSUE FOR FALL 2010 MEETING

Table of Contents
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1. Fall 2010 AGU Meeting: General Information
2. List of SPA Sessions
3. SPA Aeronomy (SA) Sessions - Detailed Descriptions
4. SPA Solar and Heliospheric Physics (SH) Sessions - Detailed
Descriptions
5. SPA Magnetospheric Physics (SM) Sessions - Detailed Descriptions
6. SPA Co-sponsoring Sessions - Detailed Descriptions
=======================================================================

SPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPA

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* * * . . . . . . .
* * * AMERICAN GEOPHYSICAL UNION .
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* ********* * SPA SECTION NEWSLETTER . ..
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* * *********** * * Volume XVII, Issue 62 . o .
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* ********* * August 29, 2010 . ..
* ***** * . .. . . . . . . . .
* * * Editor: Peter Chi .
* * * Editorial Coordinator: Sharon Uy . . . . . . .
* Email: editor at igpp.ucla.edu
SPA Web Site: http://spc.igpp.ucla.edu/spa/

SPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPASPA

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1. Fall 2010 AGU Meeting: General Information
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Fall 2010 AGU Meeting
13-17 December
San Francisco, California, USA

Websites:
http://www.agu.org/meetings/fm10/

Deadlines:
02 Sep: Abstract Submissions (2359 Eastern Daylight Time)
02 Sep: External Function Request
02 Sep: Town Hall Submissions
10 Nov: Hotel Reservations
10 Nov: Discounted Registration
19 Nov: Meeting Registration Online
06 Dec: Press Pre-registration

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2. List of SPA Sessions
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* Aeronomy (SA):
SA01: SPA-Aeronomy General Contributions
SA02: Forecasting the Ionosphere and Thermosphere at Low Latitudes
SA03: Ionospheric Modification and Radar Diagnostics
SA04: Advances in Understanding Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Dynamics and
Coupling
SA05: Using Space Shuttle and Rocket Exhaust to Study the Atmosphere
SA06: Connections Between the Lower and Upper Atmosphere and Ionosphere
SA07: Remote Sensing of Ionospheric Disturbances
SA08: Unique Equatorial Ionospheric Electrodynamics in the African
Sector
SA09: Dynamics and Coupling in the Lower Part of the Thermosphere
SA10: Ice Layers in the Mesopause Region: The Role of Dynamics and
Relationship to the Environment in Which They Form
SA11: Heliosphere-Atmosphere Coupling and Climate
SA12: Frontiers in Aeronomy
SA13: Chemistry and Temperatures in the Upper Mesosphere and Lower
Thermosphere
SA14: Response of Atmosphere and Ionosphere to Solar XUV Variability
SA15: The Active Inner Magnetosphere and its Coupling With the Mid-
latitude Ionosphere
SA16: Atomic and Odd Hydrogen from the Mesosphere Through the Exosphere
SA17: Ion-Neutral Coupling in the Atmosphere

* Solar and Heliospheric Physics (SH):
SH01: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics General Contributions
SH02: Solar Wind Turbulence: Theory, Observations, and Future Mission
Concepts
SH03: Extreme Space Weather Events in the Solar System
SH04: Nonlinear Structures and Processes in the Solar Wind Plasma
SH05: Global Solar Magnetic Data as Drivers of Coronal Models
SH06: Coronal Prominence Cavities
SH07: Specification, Prediction and Observation of the Inner Solar
System's Radiation Environment
SH08: Cosmic Rays During the Recent Unusual Solar Minimum
SH09: Acceleration and Transport of Solar Energetic Particles
SH10: Comparing MHD Models to Observations in the Sun from the Interior
to the Heliosphere
SH11: Initiation, Evolution, and Interaction of Coronal Mass Ejections,
Corotating Interaction Regions, and Interplanetary Shocks From the Sun
to 1 AU
SH12: Multispacecraft Observations of Coronal Heating During the Rise
of Cycle 24
SH13: Short Term (Transitional) Precursors of Transient Solar Phenomena
SH14: Geo-effective Transients From the Sun to the Earth
SH15: Solar Dynamics Observatory Data Access and Analysis Tools
SH16: Changing the Paradigm of the Global Heliosphere Through Remote
and in Situ Measurements by IBEX and Voyager
SH17: Heliospheric Imaging of Solar Wind Structure
SH18: First Results From the Solar Dynamics Observatory
SH19: New Views of Solar Energetic Particles
SH20: From the Termination Shock to the Interstellar Medium: Dynamics
and Physical Processes
SH21: Coordinated Results with Solar Dynamics Observatory

* Magnetospheric Physics (SM):
SM01: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics
SM02: Moon-Magnetosphere Interactions at Jupiter and Saturn
SM03: Dynamical Processes of the Cusp/Polar Cap Ionosphere
SM04: Multi-Scale, Wave/Plasma Interactions Between the Magnetosphere
and Ionosphere at High Latitudes
SM05: Turbulent Magnetic Reconnection in Space, Laboratory and
Astrophysical Systems
SM06: Magnetospheric Plasma Waves: Generation, Propagation, and
Interaction with Energetic Particles
SM07: Magnetotail Transients and Their Ionospheric Signatures
SM08: Magnetospheric Response to Transient Solar Wind Features
SM09: Inner Magnetospheric Response to High-Speed Streams
SM10: Multi-point Perspective on the Auroral Acceleration Region and M-
I Coupling
SM11: Dynamics in the Saturnian Magnetosphere
SM12: Origins of Near-Earth Plasma
SM13: Auroral Forms and Their Role in the Dungey Convection Cycle
SM14: Progress in Modeling Kinetic-Global Coupling in Space Weather
SM15: Momentum and Energy Transfer and Atmospheric Escape in Weakly
Magnetized Objects
SM16: Radiation Belt Physics: Mysteries and Solutions
SM17: Parker Lecture (Webcast)
SM18: Magnetospheric and Auroral Acceleration: Cause and Effect
SM19: Heliophysics Data Environment: Success Stories and Lessons
Learned
SM20: Space Weather Forecasting: Present Status and Future Directions
SM21: Physical Processes in the Magnetotails of Intrinsic and Induced
Magnetospheres

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3. SPA Aeronomy (SA) Sessions - Detailed Descriptions
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SA01: SPA-Aeronomy General Contributions

Sponsor: SPA-Aeronomy

Conveners:
Larisa Goncharenko
MIT
(781) 981-5622
lpg@haystack.mit.edu

Ian Richardson
NASA Goddard Space Flight Cent
(301) 286-3079
ian.g.richardson@nasa.gov

Aaron Ridley
University of Michigan
(734) 764-5727
ridley@umich.edu

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SA02: Forecasting the Ionosphere and Thermosphere at Low Latitudes

Sponsor: SPA-Aeronomy

Conveners:
Odile de La Beaujardiere
odile.delabeaujardiere@hanscom.af.mil

David Anderson
Univ of Colorado
(303) 497-7754
david.anderson@noaa.gov

Yi-Jiun Su
Air Force Research Laboratory
(781) 377-3970
yijiunsu@gmail.com

Cheryl Huang
AFRL
781-377-1312
cheryl.huang@hanscom.af.mil

Index Terms: 2415 2427

Description: Our ability to forecast the ionosphere and thermosphere at
low latitudes is limited by poor characterization of ionosphere-
thermosphere coupling mechanisms, as well as limited understanding of
the coupling between high and low latitudes. Contributions are solicited
that exploit models, C/NOFS and other satellite data, and ground-based
observations to improve our ability to specify and forecast the
thermosphere and ionosphere, including scintillation.

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SA03: Ionospheric Modification and Radar Diagnostics

Sponsor: SPA-Aeronomy
CoSponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics

Conveners:
Mark Golkowski
University of Colorado Denver
303-352-3852
mark.golkowski@ucdenver.edu

Michael Sulzer
Arecibo Observatory
(787) 878-2612 X255
msulzer@naic.edu

Index Terms: 2403 2471 0310 2431

Description: Experiments involving active modification of the ionosphere
with high power radio waves, high altitude particle releases, and
associated radar diagnostics have proven to be instrumental in fostering
understanding of the ionosphere under a variety of conditions as a
result of responses to the induced perturbations. The physical phenomena
include electron heating and acceleration, density perturbations and
irregularities, plasma turbulence, artificially induced optical
emissions, stimulated electromagnetic emissions, and ULF/ELF wave
generation with subsequent propagation and interactions in the
magnetosphere. We welcome papers on theoretical modeling, numerical
simulations, and ground/satellite observations.

-------------------------------------------

SA04: Advances in Understanding Magnetosphere-Ionosphere Dynamics and
Coupling

Sponsor: SPA-Aeronomy
CoSponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics

Conveners:
Dennis Gallagher
NASA MSFC
(256) 961-7687
dennis.l.gallagher@nasa.gov

Janet Kozyra
University of Michigan
(734) 647-3550
jukozyra@umich.edu

James Spann
NASA MSFC
(256) 961-7215
jim.spann@nasa.gov

Index Terms: 2400 2700 7800 2407

Description: This session solicits papers that explore and seek to
explain how magnetospheric dynamics provides energy to the ionosphere
and how in turn, the ionosphere influences magnetospheric dynamics.
Fundamental plasma processes control the energy and momentum exchange of
our ionosphere-magnetosphere system and can lead to valuable insights of
broader space environment variability issues at Earth and other planets.
Identifying the top priority, unresolved coupling processes is the focus
of this session. Results of data analysis, theory investigations, and
proposed observations are encouraged. Papers focused on phenomenological
exposition and system level analysis are also appropriate.

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SA05: Using Space Shuttle and Rocket Exhaust to Study the Atmosphere

Sponsor: SPA-Aeronomy
CoSponsor: Atmospheric Sciences

Conveners:
Michael Stevens
Naval Research Laboratory
(202) 404-7226
michael.stevens@nrl.navy.mil

Geoffrey Crowley
ASTRA
(210) 877-9150
gcrowley@astraspace.net

Xinzhao Chu
Department of Aerospace Engineering Sciences, University of Colorado
303-492-3280
Xinzhao.Chu@Colorado.edu

Paul Bernhardt
Plasma Physics Division, Naval Research Laboratory
202-767-0196
bern@ppd.nrl.navy.mil

Index Terms: 0310 0355 3369 3389

Description: The space shuttle and other launch vehicles introduce large
amounts of exhaust molecules and particulates into the mesosphere and
thermosphere. Using observations of the shuttle's main engine exhaust,
recent work includes unusually rapid meridional transport, molecular
diffusion, the formation of polar mesospheric clouds (PMCs) and
triggering of artificial sporadic-E layers. Other studies of shuttle
exhaust include modifications of the ionosphere, enhanced radar
backscatter, excitation of plasma waves and artificial airglow. We
welcome studies of shuttle and rocket exhaust interacting with the
atmosphere, including effects of dust, transport of effluents, diffusion,
PMC formation, and plume chemistry.

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SA06: Connections Between the Lower and Upper Atmosphere and Ionosphere

Sponsor: SPA-Aeronomy
CoSponsor: Atmospheric Sciences

Conveners:
Rashid Akmaev
NOAA SWPC
(303) 497-3616
rashid.akmaev@noaa.gov

Ruth Lieberman
Colorado Research Assoc
ruth@co-ra.com

Index Terms: 2427 3389 3369

Description: Ample observational evidence has recently emerged revealing
close connections between lower atmosphere dynamics and temporal and
spatial variability in the thermosphere and ionosphere. Examples include
observations of persistent four- or three-peak longitudinal structures
in ionospheric electric fields and plasma and neutral densities, or
drastic changes in the equatorial ionospheric anomaly during sudden
stratospheric warmings. Correlative data analysis and modeling studies
are solicited. While mechanisms of such correlations are still under
investigation, contributions offering insights into physical mechanisms
of the teleconnections between terrestrial and space weather are of
particular interest.

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SA07: Remote Sensing of Ionospheric Disturbances

Sponsor: SPA-Aeronomy
CoSponsor: Geodesy
Natural Hazards
Ocean Sciences
Seismology

Conveners:
James Garrison
Purdue University
(765) 496-7482
jgarriso@ecn.purdue.edu

Attila Komjathy
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
Attila.Komjathy@jpl.nasa.gov

Giovanni Occhipinti
Institut de Physique du Globe de Paris
ninto@ipgp.jussieu.fr

Index Terms: 2427 2435 6934 4564

Description: Remote sensing of the ionosphere highlights disturbances in
the plasma density and velocity, principally induced by acoustic-gravity
waves in the neutral atmosphere. In addition to a strong seasonal
dependence, these are natural or anthropogenic sources for these
disturbances (e.g., earthquakes, rockets, nuclear tests, tsunamis).
Consequently, sensing the ionosphere (e.g., GPS, HF-Doppler, OTH radar,
Airglow) opens new perspectives on various fields such seismology,
ocean-monitoring and atmospheric sciences. Presentations are solicited
on observation/modeling of disturbances in to improve our understanding
of sources and coupling mechanisms and develop potential applications
for improved monitoring of natural and human-induced processes.

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SA08: Unique Equatorial Ionospheric Electrodynamics in the African
Sector

Sponsor: SPA-Aeronomy
CoSponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics

Conveners:
Endawoke Yizengaw
Institute of Scientific Research
(617) 552-4328
kassie@bc.edu

Keith Groves
Air Force Research Laboratory
(617) 549-7067
keith.groves@hanscom.af.mil

Trevor Garner
Univ Texas
(512) 835-3664
garner@arlut.utexas.edu

Index Terms: 2415 2435 2439 2441

Description: Satellite observations show unique equatorial ionospheric
structures in the African sector, such as F-region plasma irregularities
and scintillations. During the past few years a significant number of
instruments have been deployed and simultaneous observations (from the
ground and space) became possible. This session attempts to understand
the sequence of cause and effect relationships by including data
analysis and theory/modeling papers that address all aspects of
ionospheric electrodynamics. While emphasizing recent progress and
outstanding issues in the equatorial electrodynamics in the African
sector, we welcome any papers that shed light on relevant physical
processes and comparisons with other longitudinal sectors.

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SA09: Dynamics and Coupling in the Lower Part of the Thermosphere

Sponsor: SPA-Aeronomy
CoSponsor: Atmospheric Sciences

Conveners:
Qihou Zhou
Miami University
(513) 529-6506
q_zhou@yahoo.com

Hanli Liu
National Center for Atmospheric Research
(303) 497-1564
liuh@ucar.edu

Michael Nicolls
SRI International
(650) 859-4813
michael.nicolls@sri.com

Scott England
UC Berkeley
5106439439
england@ssl.berkeley.edu

Index Terms: 2437 3369 2427 2494

Description: This session focuses on ground- and space-based
observations, and theoretical and modeling studies, of the dynamics and
coupling in the altitude range of ~100-250 km, where the most complex
ionosphere and atmosphere coupling processes occur. Suitable topics
include but are not limited to: Hydrodynamics in the region and coupling
with other atmospheric regions; Electrodynamics of the ionosphere and
coupling with the thermosphere; Structure and composition of the
ionosphere/ thermosphere; and Observational and numerical techniques
relevant in this region. Because of the wide availability of data from
various ground-based instruments and satellites during January 2010,
contributions involving this period are especially welcome.

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SA10: Ice Layers in the Mesopause Region: The Role of Dynamics and
Relationship to the Environment in Which They Form

Sponsor: SPA-Aeronomy
CoSponsor: Atmospheric Sciences

Conveners:
James Russell
Hampton University
(757) 728-6893
tasha.cartharn@hamptonu.edu

Scott Bailey
Virginia Tech
(540) 231-0459
baileys@vt.edu

Index Terms: 0320 0319 0340 3334

Description: We are in a period of unprecedented progress in observation,
modeling, and overall understanding of the mesopause region and of the
ice layers that form there. In this session we seek to highlight new
results that add to our understanding of the coupling between the
mesopause ice layers and the mesopause environment. We solicit papers
discussing the role of atmospheric dynamics in polar mesospheric cloud
formation and variability, the microphysics of the ice layers, the
composition and structure of the mesopause environment, sources for ice
particle nucleation and nucleation processes. Observational and
theoretical papers are welcome.

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SA11: Heliosphere-Atmosphere Coupling and Climate

Sponsor: SPA-Aeronomy
CoSponsor: Atmospheric Sciences
Global Environmental Change
SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics
SPA-Magnetospheric Physics

Conveners:
Cora Randall
University of Colorado
(303) 492-8208
randall@lasp.colorado.edu

Charles Jackman
NASA Goddard SFC
(301) 614-6053
charles.h.jackman@nasa.gov

Stanley Solomon
NCAR
(303) 497-2179
stans@ucar.edu

Xiaohua Fang
University of Colorado
(303) 735-3729
xiaohua.fang@lasp.colorado.edu

Index Terms: 0341 1610 2716 2427

Description: In recent decades increased attention has been placed on
the influence of energetic particle and solar forcing on atmospheric
coupling. Nevertheless, a solid mechanistic understanding of the
pathways by which this forcing affects climate from the thermosphere to
the surface is elusive. Likewise, the influence of tropospheric change
on the upper atmosphere response to heliophysical variability is highly
uncertain. This session invites presentations on the Earth's atmospheric
response to geomagnetic and solar forcing, including observational and
modeling studies of both chemical and dynamical effects. Emphasis is on
the processes by which heliophysical forcing is communicated throughout
different atmospheric regions, and potential climate feedbacks.

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SA12: Frontiers in Aeronomy

Sponsor: SPA-Aeronomy

Conveners:
Larry Paxton
JHU/APL
(240) 228-6871
larry.paxton@jhuapl.edu

James Clemmons
The Aerospace Corporation
3103362428
james.clemmons@aero.org

Jeff Thayer
University of Colorado
303-492-1764
jeffrey.thayer@colorado.edu

Index Terms: 2400 7900 0355 0358

Description: This session aims to identify the frontiers and current
issues in our understanding of the ionosphere, thermosphere, and
mesosphere (ITM) system. Advances fueled by satellite missions have been
further enabled by advances in models, new measurement capabilities, the
widespread and routine availability of data sets, and new developments
in information access techniques. This session seeks contributions
addressing evolving ITM science issues, as examples, what we have
learned in the previous solar cycle, what we need to improve (models,
instruments, coverage, etc), and what the key questions are that must be
addressed in order to advance our understanding of the ITM and its
coupling to the environment above and below.

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SA13: Chemistry and Temperatures in the Upper Mesosphere and Lower
Thermosphere

Sponsor: SPA-Aeronomy
CoSponsor: Atmospheric Sciences
Volcanology, Geochemistry, and Petrology

Conveners:
Rebecca Bishop
The Aerospace Corporation
(310) 336-1750
Rebecca.L.Bishop@aero.org

Scott Budzien
Naval Research Laboratory
(202) 767-9372
budzien@nrl.navy.mil

Andrew Stephan
Naval Resaerch Laboratory
202-767-0211
andrew.stephan@nrl.navy.mil

Geoffrey Crowley
ASTRA
(210) 877-9150
gcrowley@astraspace.net

Index Terms: 0355 0340

Description: Lower atmospheric coupling influences the structure and
dynamics of the IT (define) system. The MLT (define) coincides with
processes such as tidal dissipation, ionospheric dynamos, and radiative
cooling. Yet the MLT region has been undersampled globally due to
experimental limitations. The session focuses on temperature, chemistry,
and composition parameters (85 and 200 km) by combining recent space-
based (e.g. TIMED, RAIDS), ground-based, and modeling efforts. We
solicit abstracts emphasizing: 1.Satellite/ground-based observations of
temperature, composition, and chemistry 2.Modeling studies of the global
variability of temperature/composition 3.Studies linking observations
and current model results to identify future study areas.

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SA14: Response of Atmosphere and Ionosphere to Solar XUV Variability

Sponsor: SPA-Aeronomy
CoSponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Elsayed Talaat
The Johns Hopkins University Applied Physics Laboratory
(443) 778-3971
elsayed.talaat@jhuapl.edu

Timothy Fuller-Rowell
CIRES
303-497-5764
tim.fuller-rowell@noaa.gov

Liying Qian
National Center for Atmospheric Research
303-497-1529
lqian@ucar.edu

Philip Richards
George Mason university
7039731168
richards@cs.uah.edu

Index Terms: 2400 0355 0340 2423

Description: Solar X-ray and ultraviolet (XUV) irradiance has important
influences on the chemistry, energetics, and dynamics of the ionosphere-
thermosphere-mesosphere (ITM) via direct energy deposition, effects on
chemically active minor constituents, and modulation of ion-neutral
frictional heating. Measurements of the solar XUV spectrum have recently
become available over various phases of the solar cycle. In addition,
numerous spaceborne and groundbased platforms have observed electron
density, and neutral and ion composition and temperature. Papers are
solicited discussing observational and modeling results that highlight
new findings, improved insights, and new questions on the solar XUV
variability effects on the ITM.

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SA15: The Active Inner Magnetosphere and its Coupling With the Mid-
latitude Ionosphere

Sponsor: SPA-Aeronomy
CoSponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics

Conveners:
Anthea Coster
MIT Haystack Observatory
781-981-5753
ajc@haystack.mit.edu

J. Ruohoniemi
Virginia Tech
mikeruo@vt.edu

Joseph Baker
Virginia Tech
540-231-3355
jo.baker@vt.edu

Index Terms: 2400 2700

Description: The plasmaspheric boundary layer (PBL) is a dynamic region
between two distinct plasma flow regimes, one convecting sunward, the
other co-rotating. It is where instability processes important for the
energization and decay of the radiation belt are generated; where the
structuring and redistribution of thermal plasmas develop; and where
electric fields which couple the ionosphere, plasmasphere, and
magnetosphere are formed. Some of the consequences of the dynamics in
this region result in significant space weather features, such as the
storm enhanced density plume. This session welcomes observational and
modeling studies that address the causes and consequences of activity
across this region.

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SA16: Atomic and Odd Hydrogen from the Mesosphere Through the Exosphere

Sponsor: SPA-Aeronomy
CoSponsor: Atmospheric Sciences

Conveners:

Geoffrey Crowley
ASTRA
(210) 877-9150
gcrowley@astraspace.net

David Siskind
Naval Research Lab
david.siskind@nrl.navy.mil

Edwin Mierkiewicz
Univ. of Wisconsin-Madison
(608) 262-1152
emierk@astro.wisc.edu

Index Terms: 0328 0355 0341 5405

Description: The spatial distribution and temporal evolution of hydrogen
in the earth's middle and upper atmosphere are important indicators of
chemistry, transport, solar-terrestrial coupling and atmospheric
evolution. Despite its importance, the processes which control hydrogen
in the terrestrial atmosphere from the mesosphere through the exosphere
are not well understood, and in many cases models do not agree with data.
This session provides a forum for presentations on theory, modeling and
measurements of the spatial distribution and temporal evolution of
hydrogen from the mesosphere through the exosphere, including talks
focused on limited altitude regimes and those that include aspects of
coupling, chemistry and transport.

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SA17: Ion-Neutral Coupling in the Atmosphere

Sponsor: SPA-Aeronomy

Convener: James Clemmons
The Aerospace Corporation
3103362428
james.clemmons@aero.org

Robert Pfaff, Jr.
NASA/GSFC
(301) 286-6328
Robert.F.Pfaff@nasa.gov

Geoffrey Crowley
ASTRA
(210) 877-9150
gcrowley@astraspace.net

Roderick Heelis
University of Texas at Dallas
972 883 2822
heelis@utdallas.edu

Index Terms: 2427 0358 2437

Description: Ion-neutral coupling is a fundamental physical process that
governs important aspects of the behavior and evolution of the
ionosphere-thermosphere system. It is the focus of a new space mission,
notionally called Ion-Neutral Coupling in the Atmosphere (INCA) that is
recognized in NASA's 2009 Heliophysics Roadmap. Many open questions
remain about this process, however. This session solicits presentations
that discuss the scientific fundamentals and the current state of
understanding of ion-neutral coupling, the directions in research needed
for further advancement, and the open questions that current results
raise or highlight.

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4. SPA Solar and Heliospheric Physics (SH) Sessions - Detailed
Descriptions
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SH01: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics General Contributions

Sponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Larisa Goncharenko
MIT
(781) 981-5622
lpg@haystack.mit.edu

Ian Richardson
NASA Goddard Space Flight Cent
(301) 286-3079
ian.g.richardson@nasa.gov

Aaron Ridley
University of Michigan
(734) 764-5727
ridley@umich.edu

---------------------------

SH02: Solar Wind Turbulence: Theory, Observations, and Future Mission
Concepts

Sponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics
CoSponsor: Nonlinear Geophysics
SPA-Magnetospheric Physics

Conveners:
J. Podesta
Los Alamos National Laboratory
(505) 606-1959
jpodesta@solar.stanford.edu

Gang Li
Univ Alabama Huntsville
256-961-7311
gang.li@uah.edu

Index Terms: 2149 2159 4490 4475

Description: The solar wind is a unique laboratory for the study of MHD
turbulence. The goal of this session is to highlight recent advances in
observations, theory, and simulations of MHD turbulence in the solar
wind, as well as new concepts for future science missions. We invite
papers that discuss topics such as the physics of the inertial range,
dissipation range, and energy containing range of MHD turbulence in the
solar wind; the observed properties of coherent structures and waves;
kinetic processes and plasma heating at small scales; and the need for
high time resolution, high accuracy, simultaneous plasma and magnetic
field measurements

---------------------------

SH03: Extreme Space Weather Events in the Solar System

Sponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics
CoSponsor: Planetary Sciences
SPA-Aeronomy
SPA-Magnetospheric Physics

Conveners:
Yingjuan Ma
IGPP, UCLA
(310) 825-5097
yingjuan@igpp.ucla.edu

Ming Zhang
Florida Institute Technology
(321) 674-8891
mzhang@fit.edu

Paul Withers
Boston University
(617) 353-1531
withers@bu.edu

Alexander Ruzmaikin
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology
(818) 393-3953
Alexander.Ruzmaikin@jpl.nasa.gov

Index Terms: 7500 6200 7514 6040

Description: This session will focus on extreme space weather events and
their effects throughout the solar system. We would like to bring
together heliophysical and planetary scientists to initiate and broaden
inter-disciplinary collaborations between the two groups. Studies to
understand the formation and causes of the Sun's extreme activities in
the form of very major flares, fast coronal mass ejections, and their
related large fluxes of Solar Energetic Particles (SEPs) are welcomed.
Also welcomed are studies to understand the interaction of extreme solar
wind events with solar system bodies, especially their long-term
consequences.

---------------------------

SH04: Nonlinear Structures and Processes in the Solar Wind Plasma

Sponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Dastgeer Shaikh
dastgeer.shaikh@uah.edu

Alexander Lazarian
University of Wisconsin
alazarian@facstaff.wisc.edu

G. Zank
The Center for Space Plasma and Aeronomic Research The University of
Alabama in Huntsville
garyp.zank@gmail.com

Index Terms: 7800 7859 7524 2149

Description: Observations of the solar wind have now been made from
within 1 AU out to beyond the termination shock. These reveal a
remarkable change in solar wind properties with heliocentric distance.
We invite papers that discuss the nonlinear character of the solar wind
plasma such as the onset and evolution of compressibility, spectral and
variance anisotropies, cascades, dissipation, heating, reconnection,
partially ionized plasma processes, and formation of nonlinear
structures.

---------------------------

SH05: Global Solar Magnetic Data as Drivers of Coronal Models

Sponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Carl Henney
cjhenney@gmail.com

Charles Arge
Air Force Research Laboratory
(505) 846-1965
nick.arge@kirtland.af.mil

Index Terms: 7524 7529 7509 7959

Description: With current ground and space instruments, the magnetic
field can only be recorded for approximately half of the solar surface
at any given time. This means any global solar magnetic field map
includes data that are at least 13 days old. Global magnetic maps are
made using numerous methods that range from extremely simplistic (e.g.,
assuming solid body rotation) to advanced magnetic flux transport
modeling. Artifacts like monopole or higher moments and the lack of flux
evolution and emergence on the far-side can have tremendous influence on
heliospheric models. Contributions are solicited that address the
challenges and limitations of creating global solar magnetic field maps
and how this affects coronal and solar wind models.

---------------------------

SH06: Coronal Prominence Cavities

Sponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Convener: Sarah Gibson
NCAR
(303) 497-1587
sgibson@ucar.edu

Thomas Berger
Lockheed Martin Solar and Astrophysics Laboratory
(650) 354-5819
berger@lmsal.com

Therese Kucera
NASA Goddard SFC
(301) 286-0829
therese.a.kucera@nasa.gov

Index Terms: 7509 7513 7524 7531

Description: Prominences in the corona are often observed surrounded by
extended dark cavities, which provide clues to coronal MHD equilibria
and to the destabilizing processes that drive CMEs. The magnetic
structure of prominences and their cavities also has implications for
their thermal and dynamic properties. The advent of new coronal and
prominence magnetic field observations, high resolution soft-X-ray and
extreme-ultraviolet observations, and coronal observations from multiple
vantage points, allows the details of cavities and their connections to
prominences to be probed as never before. Contributions are invited that
use these new observations, along with recent advances in modeling, to
focus on the role of cavities in fundamental processes of magnetic
energy storage and release.

---------------------------

SH07: Specification, Prediction and Observation of the Inner Solar
System's Radiation Environment

Sponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Kamen Kozarev
Boston University
617-353-7430
kamen@bu.edu

Lawrence Townsend
The University of Tennessee
ltownsen@tennessee.edu

Cary Zeitlin
Southwest Research Institute
zeitlin@boulder.swri.edu

Maher Dayeh
Southwest Research Institute
(210) 522-6851
maher.aldayeh@swri.org

Index Terms: 7984 7514 7938 7934

Description: A central objective of the space weather community is
specifying the radiation environment in the inner solar system to enable
renewed human exploration outside low-Earth orbit. This special session
focuses on efforts by the space physics and radiation biology
communities to connect observations and simulations of solar energetic
particles (SEPs) and galactic cosmic rays (GCRs) to characterization of
radiation hazards and acute risks of the space environment. We invite
papers that: model the evolution of the solar system's radiation
environment due to solar events (SEPs) and GCRs; explore risk assessment
approaches and biological impact predictions from radiation and
energetic particle observations.

---------------------------

SH08: Cosmic Rays During the Recent Unusual Solar Minimum

Sponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Vladimir Florinski
University of Alabama, Huntsville
(256) 961-7317
vaf0001@uah.edu

Jozsef Kota
University of Arizona
(520) 621-4396
kota@lpl.arizona.edu

Frank McDonald
University of Maryland
(301) 405-4861
fmcdonal@umd.edu

Index Terms: 2104 2134 2162 2124

Description: The recent unusually deep solar minimum offers unique
insights into the transport of galactic and anomalous cosmic rays
through the heliosphere. The magnitude of the solar polar field was
lower than at any time during the space age, while the heliospheric
current sheet remained relatively high. Whereas the flux of galactic
cosmic rays attained a record level, this was not so for anomalous
cosmic rays. The pristine conditions in the heliosphere give an
unprecedented opportunity to identify the role of different drivers of
solar modulation. We invite papers that address how observations,
modeling and theory contribute to our understanding of the behavior of
cosmic rays during the recent solar minimum.

---------------------------

SH09: Acceleration and Transport of Solar Energetic Particles

Sponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics
CoSponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics

Conveners:
Gang Li
Univ Alabama Huntsville
256-961-7311
gang.li@uah.edu

Justin Kasper
Smithsonian Astrophysical Obse
(617) 496-7875
jkasper@cfa.harvard.edu

Adam Szabo
NASA GSFC
(301) 286-5726
Adam.Szabo@nasa.gov

Index Terms: 7514

Description: This session focuses on open questions related to the
acceleration and transport of solar energetic particles (SEPs) from the
Sun and through the heliosphere. We solicit papers that examine possible
acceleration mechanisms and how to distinguish between them, locations
of particle acceleration within the heliosphere, relationships between
the composition of energetic particles and seed populations, and methods
to decouple the effects due to interplanetary transport and the
acceleration process. One goal of this session will be to review our
current understanding of SEPs and identify key measurements for future
spacecraft such as the SEPAT mission identified in the Heliophysics
Roadmap.

---------------------------

SH10: Comparing MHD Models to Observations in the Sun from the Interior
to the Heliosphere

Sponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Richard Frazin
University of Michigan
(734) 647-9689
rfrazin@umich.edu

Irina Kitiashvili
Stanford University
(650)723-9596
irinasun@stanford.edu

Nagi Mansour
NASA Ames Research Center
N.N.Mansour@nasa.gov

Merav Opher
Physics and Astronomy
703-993-4571
mopher@gmu.edu

Index Terms: 7509 7529 7546 7537 7524 7522 7833

Description: The latest generation of solar instruments is producing
data with unprecedented spatial and temporal resolution, providing rich
opportunities to validate MHD models ranging from the dynamo in the
interior to the corona. The increasing realism of MHD models, which now
can treat turbulent phenomena, flux emergence, formation of active
regions, energy release processes, and coronal and heliospheric dynamics,
makes this an ideal time to compare such models to the latest
observations. This should lead to important insights into the physical
mechanisms, and guide the observing programs. We invite contributions
that explore how well state-of-the-art modeling efforts reproduce key
aspects of the observations, as well as discuss the physical
implications and future directions.

---------------------------

SH11: Initiation, Evolution, and Interaction of Coronal Mass Ejections,
Corotating Interaction Regions, and Interplanetary Shocks From the Sun
to 1 AU

Sponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics
CoSponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics

Conveners:
Chin-Chun Wu
Naval Research Laboratory
202-404-7805
Chin-chun.Wu@NRL.NAVY.MIL

Simon Plunkett
Naval Research Laboratory
(202) 404-3720
simon.plunkett@nrl.navy.mil

Shi Tsan Wu
Univ Alabama Huntsville
(256) 824-6413
wus@uah.edu

Kan Liou
John Hopkins Univ
(240) 228-3279
kan.liou@jhuapl.edu

Index Terms: 7513 7851 7959 7954

Description: Coronal mass ejections, corotating interaction regions, and
interplanetary shocks can now be observed continuously from the Sun to 1
AU. This ability provides an opportunity to investigate how CMEs, CIRs,
and interplanetary shocks are initiated, how they evolve, and how they
interact with each other. Presentations based on data analysis or
numerical modeling are solicited. Papers that focus on recent
geoffective events, for example, the April 03, 2010 solar event that may
have damaged the 'Galaxy 15' communications satellite, are particularly
welcome.

---------------------------

SH12: Multispacecraft Observations of Coronal Heating During the Rise of
Cycle 24

Sponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics


Conveners:
Richard Frazin
University of Michigan
(734) 647-9689
rfrazin@umich.edu

Enrico Landi
University of Michigan
enrico.landi@nrl.navy.mil

Index Terms: 7509

Description: The recent launch of state of the art instrumentation on
board Hinode, STEREO and Solar Dynamics Observer (SDO) has allowed
diagnostic studies of the dynamics and evolution of small and large
scale structures in the solar corona at an unprecedented level of detail.
Multi-wavelength observations of coronal plasmas have provided new
insights into the coronal heating mechanisms, including evidence of the
presence of very hot, subflare temperature plasma in quiescent active
regions. Detailed plasma diagnostics have been made possible of coronal
mass ejections, plasma loops, bright points, coronal hole jets, and
other structures. Papers are solicited that focus on how such
observations can advance our understanding of coronal heating.

---------------------------

SH13: Short Term (Transitional) Precursors of Transient Solar Phenomena

Sponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Janet Johnston
AFRL
(781) 377-2138
janet.johnston@hanscom.af.mil

K Balasubramaniam
USAF/AFRL
(575) 434-7134
bala@nso.edu

Index Terms: 7507 7509 7529 7924

Description: The new synoptic observing instruments, such as SDO, are
ideal for examining the short term precursors of solar phenomena such as
flares, filament eruptions, CMEs, and surges. Transitional precursors
bridge "deterministic" forecasts, when an event such as a CME has
already occurred, and longer duration "climatological" forecasts. We
solicit attempts to identify these precursors (on timescales of few
minutes to hours to ~1-2 days), which may include changes in brightness,
spatial and magnetic field characteristics, and temporal characteristics
of observables across the entire electromagnetic spectrum. Statistical
studies of these precursors as forecasting tools are encouraged.

---------------------------

SH14: Geo-effective Transients From the Sun to the Earth

Sponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics
CoSponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics

Conveners:
Noe Lugaz
Institute for Astronomy
(808) 956-8534
nlugaz@ifa.hawaii.edu

Alexis Rouillard
CESR
33563946660
alexisrouillard@yahoo.co.uk

Charles Farrugia
Univ New Hampshire Durham
(603) 682-4596
charlie.farrugia@unh.edu

Index Terms: 2111 7900 2102 2784

Description: This session focuses on observational, modeling and
theoretical studies of geoeffective structures. We solicit contributions
which address: 1) the characteristics of geoeffective structures and
which function of their parameters accounts best for their
geoeffectivess, 2) their solar origins and the mechanisms which control
their formation, and 3) advances from observations and modeling to
forecast their parameters at 1 AU. We are particularly interested in
recent progresses to determine geoeffective characteristics from
heliospheric observations (SMEI, SECCHI), and also modeling efforts to
advance space weather forecasting and studies to determine the best way
to quantify the geo-effectiveness potential of solar-terrestrial
transients.

---------------------------

SH15: Solar Dynamics Observatory Data Access and Analysis Tools

Sponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics
CoSponsor: Earth and Space Science Informatics

Conveners:
Joseph Gurman
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
(301) 286-4767
joseph.b.gurman@nasa.gov

Philip Scherrer
Stanford Univ
(650) 723-1504
pscherrer@solar.stanford.edu

Index Terms: 7500 7974 1916 1976

Description: NASA's first Living With a Star mission, the Solar Dynamics
Observatory, is producing an unprecedented quantity - over a terabyte a
day - of image and spectral data of unprecedented quality. Accessing and
analyzing the data present issues of scope and efficiency never before
experienced by the heliophysics community. This session is designed to
familiarize potential users of the data with methods of accessing the
data, and the existing analysis tools that are freely available. We
invite abstracts for both oral, tutorial papers and posters that
describe data access methods and tools that can be used today, as well
as those in preparation.

---------------------------

SH16: Changing the Paradigm of the Global Heliosphere Through Remote and
in Situ Measurements by IBEX and Voyager

Sponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Nathan Schwadron
Boston University
(617) 358-4365
nschwadron@mac.com

Merav Opher
Physics and Astronomy
703-993-4571
mopher@gmu.edu

John Richardson
M.I.T.
978 828 6863
jdr@space.mit.edu

Peter Wurz
University of Bern
41-31-6314426
peter.wurz@space.unibe.ch

Index Terms: 2109 2124 2126 7514

Description: The Voyager satellites and the Interstellar Boundary
Explorer (IBEX) mission are transforming our understanding of the
physics of the global heliosphere (e.g., energetic particles, role of
suprathermal tails, role of the interstellar magnetic field). New
features, such as the narrow ribbon observed by IBEX, and the remarkable
variability of the inner heliosheath observed by Voyager challenge many
of our preconceptions and models of the global heliosphere. We invite
contributions that explore new observations and models of the
interaction of the solar wind with the local interstellar medium and
contributions that bridge in situ measurements and remote sensing of the
global heliosphere.

---------------------------

SH17: Heliospheric Imaging of Solar Wind Structure

Sponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Mario Bisi
Aberystwyth University
-624735
Mario.Bisi@aber.ac.uk

Timothy Howard
Southwest Research Institute
(575) 430-0639
howard@boulder.swri.edu

Christian Moestl
Space Research Institute
4.33164E+11
christian.moestl@oeaw.ac.at

Andrew Breen
Aberystwyth University
azb@aber.ac.uk

Index Terms: 2199 7513 2102 6969

Description: There exists a wide range of remote-sensing techniques to
allow for the imaging/reconstruction/modeling of the solar wind in the
inner heliosphere. Such techniques range from observations of
interplanetary scintillation (IPS) from the ground to the heliospheric
imaging of Thomson-scattered white light from instruments on spacecraft
both in Earth orbit (e.g., by SMEI) and far from the Earth (e.g.,
STEREO|HI). We solicit contributions on the 3-D structure of the inner
heliosphere, the features occurring within it (e.g. CMEs, CIRs, small-
scale transients), as well as combined observations/measurements tracing
and/or modeling of features from their solar origins to their detection
in interplanetary space using in-situ spacecraft (e.g. STEREO, Wind,
ACE). Papers discussing both techniques and scientific results are
welcomed.

---------------------------

SH18: First Results From the Solar Dynamics Observatory

Sponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:

William Pesnell
NASA / GSFC
3012864009
william.d.pesnell@nasa.gov

Phillip Chamberlin
NASA/GSFC
(301)286-6806
phillip.c.chamberlin@nasa.gov

Neal Hurlburt
Lockheed Martin ATC
(650) 354-5504
hurlburt@lmsal.com

Index Terms: 7974 7522 7524 7549

Description: This session will highlight the first science results from
NASA's Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO). SDO provides solar extreme
ultraviolet spectral irradiances, helioseismic data products, surface
magnetic fields, and ultraviolet images of the Sun at high cadence and
spatial resolution. Papers that describe using SDO data and analysis
pipelines to derive new results about the Sun, solar activity, and space
weather are solicited. Theoretical analyses that use SDO data are also
welcomed, as are discussions of calibrating space-based solar
instrumentation.

---------------------------

SH19: New Views of Solar Energetic Particles

Sponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Eileen Chollet
California Institute of Technology
(626) 395-6609
echollet@srl.caltech.edu

Dennis Haggerty
JHUAPL
(240) 228-7886
dennis.haggerty@jhuapl.edu

Richard Mewaldt
Caltech
(626) 395-6612
rmewaldt@srl.caltech.edu

Eberhard Moebius
University of New Hampshire
(603) 862-3097
eberhard.moebius@unh.edu

Index Terms: 2114 7514 7807 7845

Description: The end of solar cycle 23 and the beginning of cycle 24
presents a new opportunity to observe solar energetic particle (SEP)
events and related interplanetary phenomena simultaneously from
spacecraft separated in longitude and distance from the Sun. In addition,
imaging data from multiple viewpoints and high-cadence magnetograms
provide the best view to date of the solar and interplanetary structures
that participate in particle acceleration and transport. The
longitudinal spread of these events presents new challenges to SEP
acceleration and transport models. We invite both experimental and
theoretical contributions that discuss these topics.

---------------------------

SH20: From the Termination Shock to the Interstellar Medium: Dynamics
and Physical Processes

Sponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Jacob Heerikhuisen
University of Alabama in Huntsville
(256) 961-7318
jacob.heerikhuisen@uah.edu

Harald Kucharek
University of New Hampshire
(603) 862-2948
harald.kucharek@unh.edu

Jakobus le Roux
University of Alabama
(256) 961-7321
jaleroux@cspar.uah.edu

Index Terms: 7807 7811 7837 7859

Description: Understanding physical processes in the outer heliosphere
and beyond is critical for missions such as IBEX and Voyager. Their data
have provided new and unexpected insights into the physical processes
operating in this region, but left us with many unanswered questions.
For instance, how do pick-up ions (PUIs) interact with the termination
shock (TS)? How do PUI distributions evolve in space and time? How do
the structure and parameters of the TS affect transmission, reflection,
acceleration, and transport of ions? What is the impact of corotating
interaction regions, stream interfaces, and cosmic rays on the TS or the
heliopause? We welcome papers discussing data, modeling and theory
related to these topics.

---------------------------

SH21: Coordinated Results with Solar Dynamics Observatory

Sponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Thomas Woods
University of Colorado
(303) 492-4224
tom.woods@lasp.colorado.edu

Sarah Gibson
NCAR
(303) 497-1587
sgibson@ucar.edu

Carolus Schrijver
Lockheed Martin Advanced Technology Center
schryver@lmsal.com

David Webb
Boston College
781-377-3086
david.webb.ctr@hanscom.af.mil

Index Terms: 7524 7549 7522 7974

Description: Solar Dynamics Observatory (SDO) is our new eye on the Sun.
Many new and interesting results are already starting to emerge from
analysis of data from the individual SDO instruments. SDO has its place
in the larger Heliophysics system, and coordination of these new results
with other data sets provides for an even more powerful and complete
picture of the system and impact of solar events such as flares and
coronal mass ejections. This session will focus on combining the results
of SDO with those from other missions such as HINODE, STEREO, SOHO,
TIMED, TRACE, and RHESSI, ground based observatories such as SORCE, GONG,
CoMP, HYDRAD, and EBTEL, and theoretical modeling.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
5. SPA Magnetospheric Physics (SM) Sessions - Detailed Descriptions
-----------------------------------------------------------------------

SM01: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics

Sponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics

Conveners:
Larisa Goncharenko
MIT
(781) 981-5622
lpg@haystack.mit.edu

Ian Richardson
NASA Goddard Space Flight Cent
(301) 286-3079
ian.g.richardson@nasa.gov

Aaron Ridley
University of Michigan
(734) 764-5727
ridley@umich.edu

-------------------------

SM02: Moon-Magnetosphere Interactions at Jupiter and Saturn

Sponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics
CoSponsor: Planetary Sciences

Conveners:
Sven Simon
Universitaet zu Koeln
49 (0)221 470 2556
sven.simon@tu-bs.de

Joachim Saur
Univ. of Cologne
49 221 470 2310
saur@geo.uni-koeln.de

Kenneth Hansen
University of Michigan
(734) 764-8327
kenhan@umich.edu

Index Terms: 2732 6218 6280 2753

Description: This session will focus on new observational and
theoretical studies of the interaction between the moons of Jupiter and
Saturn and their magnetospheric environments. Of special interest are
results related to plasma and magnetic field observations from Cassini's
recent flybys of Saturn's icy satellites Enceladus, Rhea and Dione.
Studies deepening our understanding of the interconnection between
Titan's ionosphere and its highly dynamic magnetospheric environment are
also very welcome. The interaction of Jupiter's moons with the ambient
magnetospheric plasma will be especially addressed with a view to
provide support to the upcoming Juno Mission and the planning of
synergetic measurements for the proposed Europa Jupiter System Mission.

-------------------------

SM03: Dynamical Processes of the Cusp/Polar Cap Ionosphere

Sponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics
CoSponsor: SPA-Aeronomy

Conveners:
Joran Moen
University of Oslo
47-2285-5666
jmoen@fys.uio.no

Keisuke Hosokawa
The Univ. of Electro-Communications
81.424.43.5299
hosokawa@ice.uec.ac.jp

Lars Dyrud
Johns Hopkins University APL
(857) 919-4808
lars.dyrud@jhuapl.edu

Index Terms: 2706 2475 2760 2471

Description: The Polar Cap ionosphere is strongly affected by active
solar wind conditions. Coordinated observations, theory and modeling are
needed to decode the complexity of the cusp and polar cap dynamics,
relevant for GNSS and communication systems. Several large scale
projects now complement existing networks such as the RISR and PFISR
radars and global field-aligned current maps from AMPERE. This session
focuses on all aspects of high-latitude dynamics, including micro- and
macro-scale physics, field-aligned currents and flow dynamics,
generation of waves, instabilities, and scintillation phenomena. Topics
involving multi-instrument observations and those relating the plasma
physics to the observational phenomena are particularly welcome.

-------------------------

SM04: Multi-Scale, Wave/Plasma Interactions Between the Magnetosphere
and Ionosphere at High Latitudes

Sponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics
CoSponsor: Nonlinear Geophysics
SPA-Aeronomy

Conveners:
Anatoly Streltsov
Dartmouth College
(603) 646-2723
streltsov@dartmouth.edu

Joshua Semeter
Boston University
(617) 358-3498
jls@bu.edu

Index Terms: 2736 2407 2721 2752

Description: Observations of electromagnetic waves and plasma structures
conducted in the high-latitude magnetosphere and the ionosphere with
satellites, sounding rockets, and radars reveal that many questions of
what defines frequencies of these waves, how/where they are generated,
and how they are connected with the ion outflow and variations in plasma
density and temperature cannot be answered by studying the magnetosphere
and the ionosphere separately. The objective of this session is to bring
together theory, modeling, and observations of multi-scale interactions
between waves and plasma at high latitudes, considering the
magnetosphere and the ionosphere as a strongly coupled, complex system.
Contributions discussing these topics are welcomed

-------------------------

SM05: Turbulent Magnetic Reconnection in Space, Laboratory and
Astrophysical Systems

Sponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics
CoSponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Giovanni Lapenta
KU Leuven
32 16 327965
giovanni.lapenta@wis.kuleuven.be

Thomas Intrator
Los Alamos Natl Laboratory
505 665 2927
intrator@lanl.gov

Alexander Lazarian
University of Wisconsin
alazarian@facstaff.wisc.edu

Index Terms: 7835 7863 7831 7526

Description: Reconnection is often studied in laminar conditions. The
evidence of several theoretical studies is that in unsteady turbulent
conditions reconnection displays entirely new properties. Every
indication is that naturally occurring plasmas might be prone, perhaps
more prone, to turbulent reconnection conditions. We welcome
contributions that address questions such as: Does turbulence make
reconnection faster? Do we have evidence of turbulent reconnection? Can
instabilities of the current layer substantially increase the
reconnection rate? Are there functionally different scenarios in 3D
compared to 2D?

-------------------------

SM06: Magnetospheric Plasma Waves: Generation, Propagation, and
Interaction with Energetic Particles

Sponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics
CoSponsor: Atmospheric and Space Electricity
SPA-Aeronomy
SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Jacob Bortnik
UCLA
(310) 825-1659
jbortnik@gmail.com

Jay Albert
Air Force Research Lab
(781) 377-3992
jay.albert@hanscom.af.mil

Index Terms: 7867 6984 2774 2778

Description: The magnetosphere is home to a wide variety of plasma waves,
both naturally occurring, and man-made. These waves occur over a
frequency range spanning from mHz to MHz, and often play critical roles
dynamic processes such as the acceleration and loss of high-energy
particles. Furthermore, waves are able to connect together distant
regions of the magnetosphere, as well as different populations and
energy ranges of particles. This session will focus on wave generation
mechanisms, propagation, and interaction of various plasma waves with
energetic particles, particularly (but not exclusively) those of the
inner magnetosphere. Both observational and theoretical contributions
are welcome.

-------------------------

SM07: Magnetotail Transients and Their Ionospheric Signatures

Sponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics
CoSponsor: SPA-Aeronomy

Conveners:
Andrei Runov
University of California Los Angeles
3102066648
arunov@igpp.ucla.edu

Joachim Birn
Los Alamos Nat. Lab.
(505) 667-9232
jbirn@lanl.gov

Index Terms: 2744 2704 2790 7846

Description: This section focuses on recent progress in observation and
modeling of transient phenomena in the magnetotail, their optical
signatures in the auroral ionosphere, and their magnetic signatures on
the ground. We solicit papers discussing the origin and evolution
(spatial and temporal) of magnetotail transients (such as bulk flows,
energetic particle bursts, underpopulated flux tubes, dipolarization
fronts, flux ropes, plasmoids) and their role in flux and energy
transport and communication between the mid-tail and near-Earth plasma
sheet and the ionosphere. Studies of conjugate, multi-point, space-borne
and ground-based observations as well as theoretical and simulation
studies are welcome.

-------------------------

SM08: Magnetospheric Response to Transient Solar Wind Features

Sponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics


Conveners:
Qiugang Zong
UML CAR
9789344937
qiugang_zong@uml.edu

Hui Zhang
NASA Goddard Space Flight Center
(301) 286-3629
zh7926@gmail.com

Index Terms: 2784 2139 2109 2740

Description: Sudden changes in the interplanetary magnetic field/solar
wind/energetic particle conditions caused by, for example, coronal mass
ejections, solar energetic particles, dynamic pressure pulses,
tangential discontinuities, and interplanetary shocks, provide excellent
opportunities to study the complex response of the Earth's magnetosphere
and ionosphere to the solar wind. This session provides a forum to
present latest results discussing the bow shock, magnetopause, polar
cusp, magnetotail, inner magnetosphere, ionosphere and ground response
to transient solar wind features. Coordinated multi-point measurements
by the Cluster, Double Star, and THEMIS spacecraft are strongly
encouraged. Papers outlining theoretical advances and simulations are
also welcome.

-------------------------

SM09: Inner Magnetospheric Response to High-Speed Streams Sponsor: SPA-
Magnetospheric Physics

CoSponsor: SPA-Aeronomy
SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Michael Liemohn
University of Michigan
(734) 763-6229
liemohn@umich.edu

Vahe Peroomian
UCLA-IGPP
vahe@igpp.ucla.edu

Natalia Ganushkina
Finnish Meteorological Institute
-6225
Nataly.Ganushkina@fmi.fi

Index Terms: 2730 2784 2102 2443

Description: The interaction of high-speed streams with geospace is one
of the closest phenomena to a repeatable experiment in space plasma
physics. The solar wind has a characteristic progression as the
structure passes by Earth, and the resulting geospace activity is
remarkably similar from event to event (often with a ~solar rotation
period recurrence). A distinguishing response is a rather weak ring
current development yet often a strong radiation belt enhancement. This
session solicits studies of the response of geospace, in particular the
inner magnetosphere (the near-Earth plasma sheet, ring current,
radiation belts, plasmasphere, ionosphere, and thermosphere), to high-
speed solar wind streams.

-------------------------

SM10: Multi-point Perspective on the Auroral Acceleration Region and M-I
Coupling

Sponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics

Conveners:
Arnaud Masson
European Space Agency
31-71-565-5634
Arnaud.Masson@esa.int

Jolene Pickett
Univ Iowa
pickett@uiowa.edu

Index Terms: 2704 2736

Description: Two key unanswered questions related to the Auroral
Acceleration Region (AAR) are how auroral acceleration is triggered and,
due to the paucity of multipoint measurements in this region, how it
evolves with time. The heart of the AAR was crossed by the 4 spacecraft
of the ESA/NASA Cluster mission for the first time on the nightside in
December 2009/January 2010 during a dedicated data campaign. A special
focus of this session will be to highlight the first results of this
campaign. This session is also open to observational, numerical and
theoretical studies related to M-I coupling in the auroral regions and
auroral processes through in situ and remote observations of other
single or multi-spacecraft missions.

-------------------------

SM11: Dynamics in the Saturnian Magnetosphere

Sponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics
CoSponsor: Planetary Sciences

Conveners:
Jared Leisner
University of Iowa
319-335-1931
jared-leisner@uiowa.edu

Adam Masters
Mullard Space Science Laboratory
4.47816E+11
am2@mssl.ucl.ac.uk

George Hospodarsky
University of Iowa
(319) 335-1957
george-hospodarsky@uiowa.edu

Index Terms: 6275 2756 2740

Description: Saturn's magnetosphere is a complex system controlled by
disparate processes. Externally, the solar wind compresses the system,
whereas the internal plasma populations act to expand it. The water-
group neutral torus, originating in the Enceladus plume, modifies these
populations, and charged dust originating in the plume plays a largely
unexplored role. Since 2004, the Cassini spacecraft has been studying
Saturn's dynamics. We invite submissions on aspects of the dynamics
including, but not limited to, periodicities, solar wind forcing,
plasma-neutral/dust-plasma/wave-particle interactions, and the magnetic
configuration of the system. Contributions discussing recent advances in
our understanding of planetary magnetospheres are solicitated.

-------------------------

SM12: Origins of Near-Earth Plasma

Sponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics
CoSponsor: SPA-Aeronomy

Conveners:
Lynn Kistler
University of New Hampshire
603-862-1399
lynn.kistler@unh.edu

Robert Strangeway
UCLA
(310) 206-6247
strange@igpp.ucla.edu

Index Terms: 2736 2431 2427

Description: During active times the topside ionosphere is heated and
flows into the magnetosphere, escaping down tail, or becoming trapped
within the plasmasheet and ring current. The coupling mechanisms that
drive outflows still require investigation. The state of the
thermosphere and ionosphere is an important factor, while collisions and
wave heating appear to be necessary components. This session emphasizes
the ion outflow process from the thermosphere to the middle-altitude
magnetosphere, as well as the fate of the outflowing plasma. Related
descriptions of data, theory and modeling efforts are welcome, as are
discussions of relevant past and future missions. Contributions
emphasizing outstanding questions and approaches to finding solutions
are particularly welcome.

-------------------------

SM13: Auroral Forms and Their Role in the Dungey Convection Cycle

Sponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics
CoSponsor: SPA-Aeronomy

Conveners:
Jesper Gjerloev
JHU-APL
(240) 228-5014
jesper.gjerloev@jhuapl.edu

Larry Lyons
UCLA
(310) 206-7876
larry@atmos.ucla.edu

William Lotko
Dartmouth College
(603) 646-3485
wlotko@dartmouth.edu

Brian Anderson
JHU/APL
240-228-6347
brian.anderson@jhuapl.edu

Index Terms: 2704 2736 2721 2712

Description: Closing the Dungey global convection cycle is a fundamental
space physics problem that all driven magnetospheres have to resolve. At
Earth this cycle is intimately tied to the electrodynamics of the meso-
scale auroral forms seen in the nighttime sector. These recurrent forms
are associated with the field-aligned currents which determine the
pattern and degree of return flow on the nightside. The closure
processes spawn a multitude of scale sizes whose roles in energy and
momentum transport are not currently understood. Papers based on
observations from ground-based or space assets, theoretical studies, or
simulations/modeling are all welcome.

-------------------------

SM14: Progress in Modeling Kinetic-Global Coupling in Space Weather

Sponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics
CoSponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Spiro Antiochos
NASA/GSFC
(301) 286-8849
spiro.antiochos@nasa.gov

Amitava Bhattacharjee
Univ of New Hampshire
(603) 862-2507
amitava.bhattacharjee@unh.edu

Jay Johnson
Princeton Univ
(609) 243-2603
jrj@pppl.gov

Peter Yoon
Univ Maryland
(301) 405-4826
yoonp@umd.edu

Index Terms: 7827 7959

Description: A major challenge to developing robust models for space
weather is the problem of calculating the feedback between the kinetic
processes in boundary layers and global structure and dynamics. This
multi-scale coupling is essential to modeling physical mechanisms, such
as magnetic reconnection, particle acceleration, and wave heating, that
drive space weather. In recent years there has been progress on this
problem due to advances in theory, computation, and observations.
Consequently, it is timely to assess the current state of our knowledge
and capabilities in modeling kinetic-global coupling. We invite
contributions on all aspects of multi-scale modeling, including
observations that can be used to test and refine the models.

-------------------------

SM15: Momentum and Energy Transfer and Atmospheric Escape in Weakly
Magnetized Objects

Sponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics
CoSponsor: Planetary Sciences

Conveners:
Cesar Bertucci
Institute for Astronomy and Space Physics
5.41148E+11
cbertucci@iafe.uba.ar

Ronan Modolo
Laboratoire Atmosph?re, Milieux et Observations Spatiales
ronan.modolo@latmos.ipsl.fr

Dave Brain
UC Berkeley Space Sciences Lab
510 642-0743
brain@ssl.berkeley.edu

Index Terms: 2756 2780 0343 2772

Description: Weakly magnetized solar system objects with an atmosphere
and an exosphere directly interact with the plasma winds they are
immersed in. With ionization processes acting as catalysts, these
interactions consist of the transfer of energy and momentum from the
external plasma into their atmospheres. The accelerated planetary
particles escape from these bodies, with implications for atmospheric
evolution. This session is devoted to studies of the regions and
processes relevant to the transfer of energy and momentum at comets,
satellites such as Titan, or planets such as Mars and Venus. Results are
particularly welcomed from numerical simulations and in situ and remote
observations from past and current missions.

-------------------------

SM16: Radiation Belt Physics: Mysteries and Solutions

Sponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics


Conveners:
Aleksandr Ukhorskiy
JHU/APL
2402280201
aleksandr.ukhorskiy@jhuapl.edu

Nicola Fox
Johns Hopkins University/Applied Phy
(240) 228-3529
nicola.fox@jhuapl.edu

Index Terms: 2774 2784 2720 2756

Description: The fundamental processes that energize and transport
highly energetic charged particles at Earth's radiation belts operate
throughout the universe. While many key mechanisms important for
particle acceleration in the belts have been identified, profound
mysteries remain because existing observations are insufficient to
resolve complex interactions governing the global state of the belts. We
solicit papers that address mysteries of radiation belt physics and also
encourage comparative analysis of radiation belt mechanisms at Earth and
at other planets. Our goal is to identify the outstanding questions and
challenges in radiation belt physics and to understand how to solve them
with the upcoming missions and newly developed modeling tools.

-------------------------

SM17: Parker Lecture (Webcast)

Sponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics

Convener:
Jan Sojka
Utah State University
(435) 797-2964
jan.sojka@usu.edu

-------------------------

SM18: Magnetospheric and Auroral Acceleration: Cause and Effect

Sponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics


Conveners:
Clare Watt
University of Alberta
7804927284
watt@ualberta.ca

Robert Rankin
University of Alberta
780 492 5082
rrankin@ualberta.ca

David Knudsen
University of Calgary
403 220-8651
knudsen@ucalgary.ca

Index Terms: 2704 2736

Description: Observations indicate at least three categories of auroral
acceleration: pitch-angle scattering, mono-energetic and broadband
acceleration. Evidence from low-altitude satellites (e.g. FAST, DMSP)
has led to this classification, yet results from Polar, Cluster and
THEMIS indicate that acceleration also occurs further from Earth.
Auroral activity increases during geomagnetic events such as substorms,
but it is not yet clear how the substorm energy release feeds auroral
acceleration. This session is open to studies of the physical processes
and consequences of auroral acceleration. We especially encourage
contributions which elucidate relationships between low and high
altitude acceleration processes, and with geomagnetic activity.

-------------------------

SM19: Heliophysics Data Environment: Success Stories and Lessons Learned

Sponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics
CoSponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Todd King
UCLA
310-206-7201
tking@igpp.ucla.edu

Robert Weigel
George Mason University
703-993-1361
rweigel@gmu.edu

James Thieman
NASA
(301) 286-9790
james.r.thieman@nasa.gov

Robert McGuire
NASA Goddard
(301) 286-7794
robert.e.mcguire@nasa.gov

Index Terms: 7599 2799 2499 7899

Description: The Heliophysics Data Environment (HPDE) is a federation of
components and activities focused on providing uniform access to the
complete body of data and resources necessary for heliophysics research.
The components of the HPDE include mission data systems, resident and
active archives, metadata registries and virtual observatories. The
activities of the HPDE include serving data to researchers, describing
resources with SPASE compliant metadata, locating and cataloging data
resources, and providing value added services to the science community.
This session solicits papers that highlight the success stories in using
the HPDE, discuss the lessons learned and inform the community of recent
advances in available services and tools.

-------------------------

SM20: Space Weather Forecasting: Present Status and Future Directions

Sponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics
CoSponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Shawn Young
Air Force Research Laboratory
505-846-2199
Shawn.Young.2@us.af.mil

James McCollough, II
University of Colorado
(303) 492-2951
mccollou@colorado.edu

Josef Koller
Los Alamos National Lab
(505) 665-3399
jkoller@lanl.gov

Index Terms: 7924 7959 7974 7984

Description: Forecasting space weather is fraught with obstacles due to
sparse observations, computational limitations, and an incomplete
understanding of the dynamics of the Sun-Earth system. We invite
presentations on the current status and limitations of space weather
forecasting and the way forward. Presentations may focus on current and
new ideas for forecasting methods, model development, computational
optimization, incorporation of new observations or the transition to
operational use. There may be a panel discussion on current constraints
on forecasting including physical constraints, such as the prediction of
B<sub>z</sub> values, computational constraints on models and other
limitations when forecasting real-time.

-------------------------

SM21: Physical Processes in the Magnetotails of Intrinsic and Induced
Magnetospheres

Sponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics
CoSponsor: Planetary Sciences

Conveners:
Christopher Arridge
University College London
44 (0)1483 204 150
csa@mssl.ucl.ac.uk

Caitriona Jackman
Imperial College London
c.jackman@ic.ac.uk

Nicolas Andre
Centre d'Etude Spatiale de Rayonnements
nicolas.andre@cesr.fr

Index Terms: 2744 2784 2780 6200

Description: The magnetotails of both intrinsic and induced
magnetospheres play an important role in the dynamics of such systems.
They house much of the open flux in the system, provide a means by which
to store energy extracted from the solar wind or planetary rotation, and
regulate mass loss. Magnetotail physics is currently being studied in
situ (e.g., Messenger, Venus Express, Cluster, THEMIS, Cassini) at a
variety of interesting solar system targets and also remotely (e.g.,
comet tails) and makes this session highly topical. We welcome papers on
the structure and dynamics of magnetotails, comparisons of magnetotail
processes across the solar system and beyond, and papers discussing
global periodic phenomena.

-----------------------------------------------------------------------
6. SPA Co-sponsoring Sessions - Detailed Descriptions
-----------------------------------------------------------------------
AE03: Thunderstorm Effects in the Near-Earth Space Environment

Sponsor: Atmospheric and Space Electricity
CoSponsor: SPA-Aeronomy

Conveners:
Davis Sentman
Univ Alaska Fairbanks
(907) 474-6442
dsentman@gi.alaska.edu

Christian Hanuise
LPC2E/CNRS
33-2-38255206
christian.hanuise@cnrs-orleans.fr

Victor Pasko
Penn State University
(814) 865-3467
vpasko@psu.edu

Torsten Neubert
Technical University of Denmark
45-3532-5731
neubert@space.dtu.dk

Index Terms: 3304 3324 3394

Description: Contributions are invited for all topics related to
Transient Luminous Events (TLE). Included are TLE observations, the
dependence on the underlying lightning drivers and their ELF/VLF
electromagnetic signatures, their meteorological correlates, including
atmospheric circulation and transport processes, field-induced
perturbations in the upper atmosphere such as ionization and
conductivity, lightning-induced precipitation of electrons from the
magnetosphere, infrasonic and gravity waves and chemical perturbations,
and possible linkages to the global climate system. Contributions are
especially invited describing modeling and laboratory studies, ongoing
or new satellite programs, upcoming ground-based and balloon field
campaigns.

---------------------------------------


AE05: Energetic Radiation from Thunderstorms

Sponsor: Atmospheric and Space Electricity
CoSponsor: SPA-Aeronomy

Conveners:
Brant Carlson
Stanford University
720-220-4869
brantc@stanford.edu

Morris Cohen
Stanford University
(650) 799-3674
mcohen@stanford.edu


Steven Cummer
Duke Univ
(919) 660-5256
cummer@ee.duke.edu

Kenneth Eack
New Mexico Tech
(575) 835-5427
keack@nmt.edu

Index Terms: 3304 3324

Description: Highly energetic radiation has been observed coincident
with lightning and other thunderstorm electrical activity in recent
years, including satellite, aircraft, and ground observation of
electrons, positrons, gamma-rays, and possibly neutrons. However, the
physical processes involved remain a mystery. We invite experimental,
theoretical, and observational contributions investigating all aspects
of energetic radiation as produced in connection to atmospheric
electricity, including terrestrial gamma-ray flashes (TGFs), energetic
electron beams, positron production, runaway relativistic electron
avalanche, radio observations of lightning associated with energetic
radiation, and physical models of radiation production.

---------------------------------------

DI02: Imaging and Understanding the Electrical Conductivity of Earth's
Mantle; Lab Measurements, Regional and Global Studies, and Physical
Interpretations

Sponsor: Study of Earth's Deep Interior
CoSponsor: Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism
Mineral and Rock Physics
SPA-Magnetospheric Physics

Conveners:
Anna Kelbert
Oregon State University
(541) 737-4113
anya@coas.oregonstate.edu

James Tyburczy
Arizona State University
(480) 965-2637
jim.tyburczy@asu.edu

Index Terms: 1515 8124 7208 1025

Description: The recent progress in global and regional modeling of
electrical conductivity of the Earth's mantle provides fertile ground
for interpretations, enhancing our understanding of the physical
parameters and dynamics of the Earth's deep interior. We invite
contributions on electrical conductivity of the Earth's deep mantle,
including lab measurements and global to regional geophysical
perspectives. Studies shedding light into the relationship between
physical parameters (temperatures, melts, volatiles) of the Earth's
mantle and its electrical conductivity above, at and below mantle
transition zone depths are particularly welcome.

---------------------------------------

ED17: Teacher Professional Development Programs Promoting Authentic
Scientific Research in the Classroom

Sponsor: Education and Human Resources
CoSponsor: Atmospheric Sciences
Biogeosciences
Cryosphere
Global Environmental Change
Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism
Hydrology
Earth and Space Science Informatics
Ocean Sciences
Planetary Sciences
Seismology
SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics
SPA-Magnetospheric Physics
Tectonophysics
Volcanology, Geochemistry, and Petrology

Conveners:
Constance Walker
National Optical Astronomy Observatory
520-318-8535
cwalker@noao.edu

Gail Scowcroft
University of Rhode Island
4018746724
gailscow@gso.uri.edu

Stephen Pompea
Natl Optical Astronomy Obs
520.318.8285
spompea@noao.edu

Index Terms: 0800 0805 0830 0840

Description: The session will focus on research experiences for teachers,
the roles of scientists and education specialists, and authentic
scientific research in the classroom. Specifically, abstracts are
requested from scientists, education specialists and teachers who have
been directly involved with teacher-research experiences. Over the years,
the programs and presenters that have contributed to this session
benefited from the presentations and resulting collaborations.
Presentations are invited from any of the scientific disciplines and
from previous and new presenters. Scientist-teacher research teams are
particularly encouraged. Printed materials and CDs supplied by
presenters accompany the session.


---------------------------------------

ED18: Does Citizen-Science Equal Science Plus Public?

Sponsor: Education and Human Resources
CoSponsor: Atmospheric Sciences
Biogeosciences
Cryosphere
Earth and Planetary Surface Processes
Global Environmental Change
Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism
Hydrology
Earth and Space Science Informatics
Ocean Sciences
Planetary Sciences
Seismology
SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics
SPA-Magnetospheric Physics
Tectonophysics
Volcanology, Geochemistry, and Petrology

Conveners:
Constance Walker
National Optical Astronomy Observatory
520-318-8535
cwalker@noao.edu

Stephen Pompea
Natl Optical Astronomy Obs
520.318.8285
spompea@noao.edu

Pamela Gay
Southern Illinois University Edwardsville
pgay@siue.edu

Bryan Mendez
University of California, Berkeley
(510) 643-2178
bmendez@ssl.berkeley.edu

Brian Day
NASA
Brian.H.Day@nasa.gov

Index Terms: 0800 0805 0810 0815

Description: Citizen-science programs are gaining in popularity and have
the potential to benefit participants, extend scientific research, and
improve public understanding of how science is done by engaging non-
specialists in observations, measurements or classifications that
further scientific activity. There is a range of involvement from
passive to active and differences in how necessary citizen scientists
are to the scientific goals of programs. Some programs deal with
scientific questions that could not be investigated effectively without
the aid of large numbers of volunteers. Abstracts may also include
lessons learned from current citizen science projects in space,
environmental, biological and geo-sciences, and a discussion of future
directions.

---------------------------------------

G17: Geophysical Remote Sensing With Current And Future Global
Navigation Satellite Systems

Sponsor: Geodesy
CoSponsor: Atmospheric Sciences
Cryosphere
Ocean Sciences
SPA-Aeronomy

Conveners:
Anthony Mannucci
Jet Propulsion Laboratory, California Institute of Technology
(818) 354-1699
tony.mannucci@jpl.nasa.gov

Estel Cardellach
Institut de Ci?ncies de l'Espai/CSIC-IEEC
estel@ieec.uab.es

Chi Ao
JPL
8183936640
chi.o.ao@jpl.nasa.gov

Index Terms: 0794 2494 3307 4294

Description: New open signals from Global Navigation Satellite Systems
(GNSS) - modernized US GPS, Russian GLONASS and the planned European
Galileo and Chinese COMPASS - provide unprecedented opportunity for
novel geophysical remote sensing approaches. Reflected and scattered L-
band signals measure surface topography of oceans and cryosphere, sea
surface roughness, surface permittivity and soil moisture. GNSS radio
occultations can provide much improved atmospheric and ionospheric
retrievals, including penetration into the atmospheric boundary layer.
We encourage submissions on novel GNSS remote sensing approaches with
current and future systems, including scientific results, experimental
data and instruments.

---------------------------------------

G20: Identification and Mitigation of Systematic Errors in Space
Geodetic Results

Sponsor: Geodesy
CoSponsor: Atmospheric Sciences
Ocean Sciences
SPA-Aeronomy
SPA-Magnetospheric Physics

Conveners:
Shailen Desai
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
(818) 354-6102
shailen.d.desai@jpl.nasa.gov

Pascal Willis
Institut Geographique National
33-1-43988324
pascal.willis@ign.fr

Index Terms: 1241 1229 1239

Description: Current space geodetic techniques, such as GPS, GLONASS,
DORIS, SLR, and VLBI, are providing new geodetic results with
unprecedented precision. This is enabling the identification of
systematic errors that have previously gone undetected but which are
impacting the interpretation of space geodetic results. This session
aims to address the identification of these types of systematic errors
(e.g. solar radiation pressure, atmospheric effects, antenna
calibrations, timing), the impact that they have on geodetic
observations (e.g. coordinates, reference frame, Earth orientation,
precise orbit determination), and potential mitigation approaches (e.g.
analytical or processing approach).

---------------------------------------

GC17: Total Solar Irradiance Observations and Calibrations

Sponsor: Global Environmental Change
CoSponsor: Atmospheric Sciences
SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Richard Willson
ACRIM
(619) 407-7716
rwillson@acrim.com

Greg Kopp
CU / LASP
(303) 735-0934
greg.kopp@lasp.colorado.edu

Index Terms: 7538 1650 1694 1616

Description: The 'native' scale of ACRIM3 and VIRGO satellite TSI
results agree within 0.1%. SORCE/TIM results are lower by 0.35%,
exceeding the theoretical uncertainty bounds for these three operational
experiments. New TSI sensor calibration and characterization techniques
using lasers calibrated by cryogenic radiometers have been implemented
at LASP and NRL. Characterizations have recently been conducted on
ACRIM3, VIRGO, TIM and PREMOS sensors to understand current scale
differences and relate their results more accurately to the follow-on
experiments to be launched during 2010: PREMOS and SOVAP on PICARD and
GLORY/TIM. Papers on calibration of flight TSI instrumentation and their
impact on TSI monitoring are solicited.

---------------------------------------

GC29: Solar Spectral Irradiance and Long-Term Solar Variability:
Observations and Implications

Sponsor: Global Environmental Change
CoSponsor: Atmospheric Sciences
SPA-Aeronomy
SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Martin Snow
University of Colorado
303-735-2143
snow@lasp.colorado.edu

Rodney Viereck
NOAA/R/E/SE
(303) 497-7348
rodney.viereck@noaa.gov

William McClintock
University of Colorado
(303)591-1499
william.mcclintock@colorado.edu

Erik Richard
LASP
erik.richard@lasp.colorado.edu

Index Terms: 7538 1650 7536 3305

Description: Observations of the spectrally resolved solar irradiance
(SSI) now extend over epochs that are long enough to identify the
amplitude and phase of solar variability as a function of wavelength.
This variability impacts the entire atmosphere, ozone and climate system.
Long-term data records are often composites from several instruments or
proxies. The methods of combining records and their uncertainties must
be well understood to make valid comparisons on solar cycle timescales.
We solicit papers on the measurement of SSI, the methods of producing
composite time series, and the implications and impacts that SSI
variations have on the atmosphere, climate, and near space environment.

---------------------------------------

GP03: Geomagnetic Field Modeling and Interpretation of Satellite,
Observatory, Marine, and Aeromagnetic Data

Sponsor: Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism
CoSponsor: Study of Earth's Deep Interior
Ocean Sciences
Planetary Sciences
SPA-Aeronomy
SPA-Magnetospheric Physics
Tectonophysics

Conveners:
Michael Purucker
Raytheon at Goddard Space Flight Center
(301) 614-6473
michael.e.purucker@nasa.gov

Joseph Cain
Florida State University
(850) 644-4014
joseph.cain@fsu.edu

Index Terms: 1500 1541 1532 4500

Description: The final months of the CHAMP mission, prior to its reentry,
captured the highest resolution views of the geomagnetic field to date.
Geomagnetic field modeling provides insights in the areas of core
dynamics, lithospheric magnetization, mantle conductivity, electric
currents in the ionosphere and magnetosphere, and ocean circulation. A
series of new compilations of marine and aeromagnetic data have been
released, and we expect that significant new modeling efforts will be
required to integrate these new data sets into the planned 2011 release
of the updated World Digital Magnetic anomaly map. We solicit papers on
geomagnetic modeling and interpretation.


---------------------------------------

IN20: Scientific Workflows and Provenance: Strategies for Current and
Emerging Issues

Sponsor: Earth and Space Science Informatics
CoSponsor: Atmospheric Sciences
Education and Human Resources
Hydrology
Ocean Sciences
SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Hook Hua
NASA/JPL
Hook.Hua-1@nasa.gov

Deborah McGuinness
Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute and McGuinness Associates
5181764404
dlm@rpi.edu

Christopher Lynnes
NASA/GSFC
301-614-5185
christopher.s.lynnes@nasa.gov

Brian Wilson
Jet Propulsion Lab
(818) 354-2790
brian.wilson@jpl.nasa.gov

Index Terms: 1920 1970 1999 1936 1948 1998 1996

Description: Data are central to Earth and space science. Sharing,
understanding, and using such data leads to many questions. Where did
the data come from? How was it created? What am I allowed to do with it?
How can I collaborate with my partners in using it? This session will
focus on three emerging issues, briefly described below, that surround
the use of data in science: Semantics, Distributed Workflows, Provenance
and the Ethics of Data. Formal encoding of vocabularies and content
provision are now emerging are a requirement in web-based information
environments. A significant opportunity exists to bring community
support and endorsement to such capabilities as well as exposing
requirements for software development. Linking knowledge and data
sources often leads to distributed workflows, with challenges in
interoperability, automated construction, cloud-based workflows,
distributed provenance, and other emerging issues. Providing thorough
provenance information, sufficient to guarantee that it is possible to
understand and reproduce a data set adds to the credibility and
usefulness of the entire measurement and data processing effort. People
increasingly repurpose data in ways unforeseen and unforeseeable by the
original investigator or user community. This data sharing and reuse
imply certain ethical obligations for both data producers and users.
These obligations include ensuring that data are shared openly and
preserved for future generations, that data authors receive fair
attribution, that data are as accurate as possible, that data is
reproducible, that uncertainty is well described, and that data are not
used inappropriately.

---------------------------------------

IN21: Research Clouds: Virtualization of Infrastructure, Tools and
Services

Sponsor: Earth and Space Science Informatics
CoSponsor: Geodesy
SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics
SPA-Magnetospheric Physics

Conveners:
Robert Rankin
University of Alberta
780 492 5082
rrankin@ualberta.ca

John Shillington
1(780)700-2548
john.shillington@gmail.com

Todd King
UCLA
310-206-7201
tking@igpp.ucla.edu

Robert Weigel
George Mason University
703-993-1361
rweigel@gmu.edu

Index Terms: 1962 1908 1976 1930 1920 2700 2100

Description: Infrastructure as a Service has led to the advent of
private and hybrid clouds, which allow low-cost entry to developing
Virtual Appliances that support collaboration, processing data, and
running application codes. Benefits of virtualization include access to
potentially unlimited resources through the use of Virtual Machines on,
e.g., Amazon Web Services. On-demand resources avoid up-front
infrastructure investments as users incur cost only when they use cloud
resources. This session seeks submissions that demonstrate uses of cloud
computing in data-intensive applications. The session provides a forum
to share experiences in use of clouds, and to identify types of usage
that can be shared across disciplines.

---------------------------------------

NG03: Complex Networks in Geosciences

Sponsor: Nonlinear Geophysics
CoSponsor: Atmospheric Sciences
Hydrology
Natural Hazards
Seismology
SPA-Magnetospheric Physics
Volcanology, Geochemistry, and Petrology

Conveners:
Joern Davidsen
University of Calgary
1 403 210 7964
davidsen@phas.ucalgary.ca

Ilya Zaliapin
University of Nevada
(775) 784-6077
zal@unr.edu

Index Terms: 4430 0545 3238

Description: The emerging theory of complex networks aims at
characterizing the genesis, statistical or topological structure and
evolution of processes that can be described by networks (graphs). There
is increasing evidence that network theory can be beneficial for long-
standing geosciences problems including but not limited to pattern
formation, environmental dynamics, and prediction of extreme events in
seismology, volcanology, hydrology, atmospheric and space sciences. The
goal of this session is to showcase the potential of complex network
theory in geosciences and to solicit a wide range of papers concerned
with network concepts and ideas across disciplines in order to stimulate
cross-fertilization between different fields.

---------------------------------------

NH06: Multidisciplinary Research for Validation of Earthquake Precursors:
Case Studies and Statistics

Sponsor: Natural Hazards
CoSponsor: Atmospheric Sciences
Geodesy
Natural Hazards
Seismology
SPA-Magnetospheric Physics
Tectonophysics

Conveners:
Dimitar Ouzounov
NASA/GSFC
(301)614-5564
Dimitar.P.Ouzounov@nasa.gov

Sergey Pulinets
Institute of Applied Geophysics
9262359117
pulse1549@gmail.com

Michel Parrot
LPC2E/CNRS
Michel.Parrot@cnrs-orleans.fr

Jann-Yenq Liu
National Central University
-427491
jyliu@jupiter.ss.ncu.edu.tw

Katsumi Hattori
Chiba University
-3053
hattori@earth.s.chiba-u.ac.jp

Index Terms: 2423 3322 7223 8123

Description: We propose to discuss multidisciplinary research to
investigate earthquake precursory phenomena preceding major earthquakes.
The observational data from the last twenty years suggests the existence
of geochemical, atmospheric electromagnetic phenomena prior to some
earthquakes. The most recent events in Italy (M6.3, 2009), Haiti (M7.0,
2010) and Chile (M8.8, 2010) suggest new evidence for a distinct
coupling between the lithosphere and atmosphere/ionosphere, which are
related to this tectonic activity. Topics of the session include: case
studies of major earthquakes; statistical theory of precursor validation;
and a theory relating tectonic stress to electro-chemical and
thermodynamic processes.

---------------------------------------

NH13: Correlation and Coupling from Underground, Surface, to the
Ionosphere

Sponsor: Natural Hazards
CoSponsor: Atmospheric Sciences
Atmospheric and Space Electricity
Study of Earth's Deep Interior
Earth and Planetary Surface Processes
Global Environmental Change
Geomagnetism and Paleomagnetism
Hydrology
Earth and Space Science Informatics
Mineral and Rock Physics
Nonlinear Geophysics
Near Surface Geophysics
Planetary Sciences
Seismology
SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics
SPA-Magnetospheric Physics
Tectonophysics
Volcanology, Geochemistry, and Petrology

Conveners:
Joseph Wang
Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory
(510) 486-6753
jswang@lbl.gov

Georges Waysand
Laboratoire Souterrain Bas Bruit de Rustrel-Pays d'Apt (LSBB)
waysand@orange.fr

Index Terms: 0634 1510 7954 8488

Description: This session focuses on the correlation and coupling among
signals measured at depths, on the surface, and in the sky. Relevant
measurements and analyses among seismic, rock mechanical, hydrochemical,
electromagnetic, atmospheric, ionospheric and other processes and
phenomena can contribute to better understanding of mechanisms among
different forces, and lead to improved assessment of earthquake,
volcanic, and other natural hazards. This session invites contributions
from communities for better understanding of observed signals with
improved instruments and for further quantification of couplings among
different processes.

---------------------------------------

OS30: Lessons Learned From the Deepwater Horizon Oil Spill: Physical
Oceanography

Sponsor: Ocean Sciences
CoSponsor: Biogeosciences
Natural Hazards
Public Affairs
SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Yonggang Liu
University of South Florida
727-553-3508
yliu18@gmail.com

Amy MacFadyen
NOAA/NOS/OR&R
Amy.MacFadyen@noaa.gov

Index Terms: 4262 4534 4275 4251

Description: The Deepwater Horizon oil spill presents an unprecedented
threat to the Gulf of Mexico coasts. Effective oil spill tracking and
prediction systems are critical for the ongoing response effort.
Accurate hindcast modeling systems are essential for assessing the
damage and long-term impacts. Presentations concerning in situ and
remote sensing observations, theory, and modeling work focusing on the
oil spill movement and fate are encouraged. Topics of particular
interest include 1) tracking the oil spill by satellites, aircrafts,
vessels, AUVs, gliders, profilers, etc., and 2) numerical models
simulating the trajectory and fate of the oil spill. Experiences from
other oil spill cases are also welcome.

---------------------------------------

P06: Minds on Mimas

Sponsor: Planetary Sciences
CoSponsor: SPA-Magnetospheric Physics

Conveners:
Bonnie Buratti
JPL
(818)354-7427
bonnie.j.buratti@jpl.nasa.gov

Amanda Hendrix
JPL/Caltech
(818) 393-1628
hendrix@jpl.nasa.gov

Index Terms: 6280

Description: The unexpected discovery of a thermal anomaly on the
Saturnian satellite Mimas by the Cassini Composite Infrared Spectrometer
(CIRS) has placed greater focus on this world as an interesting and
unique object. There are albedo and color patterns that seem to match
the thermal anomaly, and textural properties that might imply
exogenously produced deposits or even current activity. This session
will focus on recent observations of this satellite as well as
theoretical studies on its interior and potential activity.

---------------------------------------

P13: Exploring Venus

Sponsor: Planetary Sciences
CoSponsor: Atmospheric Sciences
SPA-Aeronomy

Conveners:
Jorn Helbert
DLR
49 30 67055319
joern.helbert@dlr.de

Suzanne Smrekar
Jet Propulsion Laboratory
(818)354-4192
ssmrekar@jpl.nasa.gov

Index Terms: 6295 5470 5480 5494

Description: After numerous missions to Venus in the last century, the
European Venus Express mission started a new phase in the exploration of
Venus. Soon Venus Express will be joined by the Japanese Akatsuki
mission and for the first time two spacecraft from different parts of
the world will explore Venus together, and more missions are being
planned and proposed. We invite the Venus community to present the
status of their work on old or new data and to present new ideas about
Venus and its exploration.


---------------------------------------

P19: It's No Moonshine: The Amazing Origins and Evolutions of Outer
Planet Satellites

Sponsor: Planetary Sciences
CoSponsor: Cryosphere
SPA-Magnetospheric Physics

Conveners:
Candice Hansen
JPL
(818) 354-7675
candice.j.hansen@jpl.nasa.gov

Krishan Khurana
University of California at Los Angeles
(310) 825-8240
kkhurana@igpp.ucla.edu

Index Terms: 6218 6280 6290 6260

Description: This session will be devoted to exploring planetary
processes that lead to dramatically different present-day conditions on
the satellites of the outer planets. The session will highlight new
observations and geophysical modeling of remotely-sensed and in-situ
data. Contributions on the interactions of the satellites' surfaces,
atmospheres and interiors with other moons and their parent bodies,
fields and plasmas in their environments and exogenic materials from
meteorites (including micrometeorites) are very appropriate for this
session. Contributions that investigate the origins and evolutions of
the interiors, surfaces and atmospheres of multiple moons to uncover
underlying trends are especially welcome.

---------------------------------------

P22: On the Nature, Origin, and Evolution of Water on Airless Bodies

Sponsor: Planetary Sciences
CoSponsor: SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Charles Hibbitts
JHU-APL
443-778-2834
karl.hibbitts@jhuapl.edu

Rachel Mastrapa
SETI Institute/NASA Ames
(650) 604-3335
Rachel.M.Mastrapa@nasa.gov

Index Terms: 6045 6020 5470 5422

Description: Water, as H2O or OH, has now been detected on extra-
terrestrial objects from the inner Solar System through the Kuiper Belt
and is predicted on many more. Water is significant for many reasons,
including understanding the origin of life, chemical and geologic
processes, and resource utilization. In this session we solicit
presentations discussing the fundamental characteristics and processes
relevant to understanding H2O and OH, including topics on their
formation and stability on the surfaces of airless bodies in the Solar
System, interaction with the environment (i.e., other volatiles or
mineral grains, thermal and non-thermal processes), mechanical and
chemical properties, and detection techniques and limits, among others.

---------------------------------------

S19: Ambient Noise Imaging in Seismology and Helioseismology

Sponsor: Seismology
CoSponsor: Ocean Sciences
SPA-Solar and Heliospheric Physics

Conveners:
Alexander Kosovichev
Stanford University
(650)723-7667
sasha@quake.stanford.edu

Jon Claerbout
Stanford University
(650) 723-3717
claerbout@stanford.edu

Index Terms: 7270 7260 7522 7544

Description: Ambient noise imaging is a new powerful tool for
diagnostics of the solid Earth, oceans and the solar interior. Methods
of ambient noise tomography of seismology and helioseismology are based
on similar physical principles and mathematical methods, but have been
developed in parallel without much interaction. The goal of this cross-
disciplinary session is to discuss recent advances in theory,
measurements and data analysis techniques, and to promote cooperation
betweenseismologists and helioseismologists. The session will focus on
methodology of ambient noise imaging and new results from seismic arrays,
helioseismic networks and space missions.


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